how can i choose antenna & booster for my transceiver?

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Hi everybody!

i want to send some data to 3 Km over, in 2.4GHz frequency,

i find this module:

ZE10S-00

http://www.senaindustrial.com/pr...

and xbee pro s2

datasheet say out door rang for both is near 3 Km, but i want to use that in a place with some barrier

so i decided to use antenna

i want to chose one antenna with booster

which paramter is important to chose?

if i place transceiver in a metal shield, do we have noise? our distance rang decrease?

Last Edited: Fri. Oct 16, 2015 - 12:32 AM
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3Km on 2.4GHz - takes a LOT of antenna gain (like 20dB from a long yagii or dish).

You'll need line of sight from end to end, and antennas at 20 ft or so.

 

Better to do this with 902-928MHz band radios due to the lower path loss. such as

http://www.anarduino.com/details...

 

XBee - use Series 1, not 2. And PRO.

 

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thanks for your answer stevech, i should use 2.4 GHz

in this rang guide me to select an antenna and transceiver

how can i select antenna?

which parameter should i check?

for example i see:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ext-Sect...

about the shield do you know some things?

can i cover transceiver with out noise?

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You are up in a gain range where you will need a sat dish.

A 80cm dish should have a gain of    10 *log ( 0.7(pi*80)**2 / (12,5)**2 ))= 24.5dB.

 

 

 

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i am a robotic eng and don't know a lot about Telecommunications rules

please explaining more about antenna or dish.

 

thanks

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Look at houses with satellite TV.    They have dish aerials that point towards the satellite.

 

Then look at TV reporters with satellite links to their TV station.    Those dishes on the top of the trucks are really big.

 

David.

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thanks David

i want to say help to select the antenna and thanks to your sentences.(frankly in joke) :)

i want to Calculate the power and select the antenna

i don't know how it should be done

just this.

:(

 

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sooshians wrote:
i want to Calculate the power and select the antenna

i don't know how it should be done

A case study at Wireless Networking in the Developing World (WNDW) mentions Radio Mobile; that might work though I don't recall enough about its function.

WNDW -> Community -> Links might also result in joy.


Radio Mobile

Freeware by VE2DBE

Since 1988

http://www.cplus.org/rmw/english1.html

http://www.cplus.org/rmw/rme.html

Radio Mobile

for Windows 95, 98, Me, NT, XP, 2000


This software is a tool used to predict the performance of a radio system.

via

WNDW

Wireless Networking in the Developing World

Long Distance 802.11 in Venezuela

http://wndw.net/CaseStudies/Long_Distance_Venezuela.html

...

Using the free software Radio Mobile

...

The radio profile obtained with Radio Mobile is shown in Figure CsLD 2:

...

The details of the wireless link are displayed in Figure CsLD 3:

...

Edit : second URL, typo.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sun. Mar 8, 2015 - 07:31 PM
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You need to calculate your link budget. The tricky value is free space loss - this is the loss due to transmission in air. This link gives a calculator:
http://www.comsearch.com/index2.jsp
You need to know your transmitter power and the receiver sensitivity in dB.
The calculation goes a little like this:
Tx power - cable loss + antenna gain - free space loss + antenna gain - cable loss - rx sensitivity.
If the result is less than 0, then it is unlikely your radio link will work reliably.
The solution is more tx power,
Less cable loss
And more antenna gain.
For the antenna cable, i'd suggest cnt400 at a minimum if you need to go a few metres. You can look up the cable loss specs at manufacturer's websites.
Note that there may be legal and safety requirements in your country.

Last Edited: Mon. Mar 9, 2015 - 05:13 AM
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Adding to Kartman (I agree, RF 101 is a link budget).

 

But step 1 is merely this: Can you get line of sight between sites with the intended antenna heights (above treetops) ?

 

If there are buildings or terrain or lots of trees in the path, it's a no-go for 2.4GHz and probably 868/915MHz bands too

 

20+ dBi gain dishes for 2.4GHz are about 18 in. diameter. The wire-grid types are best due to low wind load.

An 18dBi or so yagi is inside a PVC pipe about 8 in. diameter and 20 in. long. Hard to stabilize in high winds.

 

This governed by the laws of physics.

 

Last Edited: Mon. Mar 9, 2015 - 06:02 AM